After more than a month without updating this blog I am back. June was intense and July has been very busy. On different posts I’ll try to fill in the gaps.

In June I visited Mexico and had the immense honour to give a lecture at my alma mater on open access, Creative Commons licenses and copyright. It took place at t 12 PM on Tuesday 11 June 2013, at the National Library, Institute of Library Studies, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), and it was generously chaired and organised by my colleague Isabel Galina (read her DH2013 closing lecture here).

I love the building of UNAM’s National Library; I spent several hours of my undergraduate years researching comic books there.

Biblioteca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, UNAM, México
Biblioteca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, UNAM, México
Main entrance to Biblioteca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, UNAM, México
Main entrance to Biblioteca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, UNAM, México
Inside the Biblioteca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, UNAM, Méxic
Inside the Biblioteca Nacional, Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, UNAM, México

Imagine what it was for this UNAM alumnus, now living in Britian, to walk into this imposing building, which holds so many memories, and seeing that the poster for my lecture was all over the place!

Poster for "El académico digital" inside the National Library, UNAM, México
Poster for “El académico digital” inside the National Library, UNAM, México

The lecture theatre was at full capacity, with people kindly seating on the floor and the steps. As usual I had too many slides, and I wish I had had more time to go into detail particularly when referring to the different types of Creative Commons licenses.  Some photos were posted on Twitter by attendees who live-tweeted the lecture, but I won’t be posting those here ;-)

As always I made my slides with the intention of sharing them online– lately I tend to think of slides as stand-alone documents, not necessarily made to be read in real time during the presentation, but to be revised later on online. You can view and download the slides here on Slideshare.

These slides are so far the most popular deck I have online, with 2,208 views since I posted them on 26 June 2013. I’m aware this is uncharacterised data and it is also likely to include automatic ’embeds’ from Twitter clients (which at least means it’s been shared on Twitter), but such a figure is interesting to say the least, speaking to me of the interest in open resources about open access publishing in Spanish.

My colleague Alberto Martinelli kindly recorded the audio of the talk and posted it on YouTube, which works as a (somewhat embarrassing, for me) complement of the slides. (¡Gracias, Alberto!).

There is still much to do regarding open access, copyright and open licenses awareness amongst scholars. Scholarly networks that have been relatively slower at embracing good practices in online scholarship in particular are very interested in comparing points of view and exchanging information. Hands-on workshops would be a great way to go in helping create greater awareness about the challenges and opportunities in the current scholarly publishing landscape.

Thank you to everyone who attended, asked questions and gave me very useful feedback. Hopefully we’ll see each other again sometime soon!